florida / flowers / ixora / today's flowers

Today’s Flower: Ixora (The Bugs Are Free)

I got  a photo of these flowers on the Ixora bushes in front of my parents’ house in Florida last time I was home.  I was thankful that I got the photo when I did, because the next day they were all gone!  The gardener decided to cut back the bushes and trim them up, and unfortunately the flowers went, too.

When my parents first moved into this house, my father had a devil of a time getting something to grown in front of the house.  The soil is very sandy and the spot very sunny.  I think it was about the sixth try that he decided on Ixora, and he planted about 8 shrubs across the front of the house.  They were tiny, but they hung in there.  Twenty-odd years later, they are a haven for geckos, salamanders, and small lizards.  Even the occasional garden snake hangs out in the Ixora jungle.

Ixora is a genus from the family Rubiaceae, consisting of tropical evergreens and shrubs. Though native to tropical areas in Asia, especially India, ixora now grows commonly in tropical climates in the USA, such as Florida. Ixora is also commonly known as West Indian Jasmine. Other common names include: rangan, kheme, ponna, chann tanea, techi, pan, santan, jarum-jarum, Jungle flame, Jungle geranium, and many more. Plants possess leathery leaves, ranging from 3 to 6 inches in length, and produce large clusters of tiny flowers in the summer. Members of Ixora prefer acidic soil, and are suitable choices for bonsai.

Ixora is a genus from the family Rubiaceae, consisting of tropical evergreens and shrubs. Though native to tropical areas in Asia, especially India, ixora now grows commonly in tropical climates in the USA, such as Florida. Ixora is also commonly known as West Indian Jasmine. Other common names include: rangan, kheme, ponna, chann tanea, techi, pan, santan, jarum-jarum, Jungle flame, Jungle geranium, and many more. Plants possess leathery leaves, ranging from 3 to 6 inches in length, and produce large clusters of tiny flowers in the summer. Members of Ixora prefer acidic soil, and are suitable choices for bonsai.

Red ixora flowers are commonly used in Hindu worship, as well as in Indian folk medicine.

It is also a popular choice for hedges in parts of South East Asia, like in Thailand. In tropical climates they flower year round.

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13 thoughts on “Today’s Flower: Ixora (The Bugs Are Free)

  1. It is a beautiful photo, such a pretty color. I remember seeing it in a photo but you have just identified it for me. Thank you and Happy New Year!

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  2. Love your Ixora picture..
    Very lovely colour and composition.
    More than your flower picture I love your black labs.
    Wonderful dogs,
    take care and have a good year.
    Gisela

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  3. I can’t remember how I found your blog..but yea for me..I”m glad I did. I’ll be visiting often. I hope it is ok if I link you on my site.

    xoxo
    Daniela

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